Drawing II: Identity and Body

Picture of Myself:

Hosted by Wucas.org

Positive attributes:

Perceptive, Logical, Compassionate

Negative attributes:

Egotistical, Apathetic, Stubborn

Perception Differences from Stereotypes of Society:

When an individual usually thinks of an adult male with long hair  either a rock musician or a 70s hippy comes to mind in most scenarios. Contrary to this, I am a fairly laid back individual who would rather sip tea than go on stage or travel the nation on a large bus. It seems rather silly to me that men cannot simply prefer to have long hair, seeing that it is one of the most decorative parts of the human body. Also, being quite on the husky side, at times people feel intimidated. As soon as you get to know me, however, you will find that I couldn’t hurt a fly.

Artist from Chapter:

Hung Liu

Artwork by Artist from Chapter:

Hosted by Wucas.org

Personally Inspirational Artist:

Van Gogh; Stephen Hoskins

Artwork by Personally Inspirational Artist:

Hosted by Wucas.org

Hosted by Wucas.org

Relation Between Myself and Inspirational Artist:

I really like the style of Van Gogh, it is highly expressive and flows extremely well. He also places the subject  throughout the face rather than simply on the eyes, which seems to happen all too often.

Stephen Hoskins also has an extremely expressive style, but he also puts an abstract concept in his portraiture which seems quite uncommon.

Drawing II: Beauty vs Repulsion

What is Beauty?
Beauty is an attribute we use to describe objects that inherently bring positive emotions, such as joy, hope, or fulfillment, to the person viewing it.

Pictures of Beauty.

Hosted by Wucas.org

Hosted by Wucas.org

Hosted by Wucas.org

What is Repulsion?
Repulsion is an attribute we use to describe objects that inherently bring negative emotions, such as disgust, fear, or anger, to the person viewing it.

Pictures of Repulsion.

Hosted by Wucas.org

Hosted by Wucas.org

Hosted by Wucas.org

Beautiful Marks.

Hosted by Wucas.org

Repulsive Marks.

Hosted by Wucas.org

Artist that align with my views on Beauty and Repulsion.
Jason Robert Bell is the artist I chose that best represented by attitude towards Beauty and Repulsion. In a lot of his works you can see he first depicts something clean, placing great effort into minor details, but after this beautiful image is created he places rough, jagged lines creating something new entirely. I feel that he is trying to depict the duality that comes between the fine line of beauty and repulsion, which in many cases is blurred. Cannot repulsive things be beautiful and beautiful things turn ugly? Below are two images that depicts his art style I have discussed above.

Hosted by Wucas.org
Image used for research, all rights to their respective owners.
Hosted by Wucas.org
Image used for research, all rights to their respective owners.

Person Project

The Japanese Tea Ceremony is a tradition that has lasted over a millenia, hardly changing since its creation. This set, hand crafted to fit the specific needs of the tea ceremony, contains all necessary pieces including utensils made from bamboo. Also, below the initial tea set, 9 small glasses, created in the concept of wabi sabi (creation through error), portrays a more modern cup, used for tea as well.

Hosted by Wucas.org

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Japanese Traditional Tea Set
Mizusashi (??) : 6” x 6” x 12″
Chawan (??): 4” x 4” x 2.5”
Chaki (??): 2” x 2” x 4”
Kensui (??): 2” x 2” x 4”

Also pictured: Hishaku (??), Chasen (??), and Chashaku (??).

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Japanese Modern Tea Set
Cup (9): 3” x 3” x 4.5”

Group Project

These pieces were created for a younger generation, so these sets were kept very childlike. Created with stoneware, most pieces were created by slabs that were then formed into pieces that appear to be from the Cretaceous period. High fired glaze, so functional usage can be completed, colors were chosen that correspond with the concept objects. Some pieces also contained stains, giving a rough appearance. Overall these sets are not only a place setting, but an educational tool as well.

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Crustaceous Place Settings
“A Leaf in a Forest”
Plate: 8” x 5” x .5″
Bowl: 6” x 4” x 3”
Cup: 3” x 3” x 8”

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Crustaceous Place Settings
“Footprint in the Mud”
Plate: 8” x 4” x .5″
Bowl: 6” x 4” x 3”
Cup: 3” x 3” x 5”

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Crustaceous Place Settings
“Black Lilly”
Plate: 5” x 5” x 2″
Bowl: 4” x 4” x 3”
Cup: 3” x 3” x 6”

Hollow Formed Sculpture

This sculpture was made using a mix of both slab and pinching techniques. Created using Roman and modern styles, it shows a woman in a very seductive position. Using a mix of underglazes and stains, this shows the internal struggle of a prostitute. “Dolore Meretricis” translates roughly into “Prostitute’s Grief”, which is vividly depicted here. The piece is quite small, and touch ups may or may not be done in the future.

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Hollow Formed Sculpture
“Dolore Meretricis”
7” x 5” x 4”

Coil Vessel Project

This set has currently been bisque fired with terra sigillata, after of which it was high fired with glazes to achieve practical usage. Containing two bowls, a single glass, and a wine pitcher, this piece seems to display an ancient interpretation of romance. Created completely by layered coils, this set is fairly large, the bowls measuring ten inches across, and the pitcher nearing knee height. The glazes, being quite earthy, strengthens the concept of aged materials. Overall this piece mixes old and new, rough and glossy, all mixing together into a piece that is not only unique, but yet usable as well.

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Coil Project
: Traditional
“Dinner for Two”
Bowls (x2): 10” x 10” x 3”; Glass: 5” x 5” x 3”; Pitcher: 6” x 12” x 24”

Body Cast Mold

This piece, designed by a plaster mold, displays worn hands placed in a crossed fashion. Being covered by varied stains, the harsh crevices and gashes in the hand are displayed vividly; the colors used create an illusion of dirt and grime covering the hand entirely. This piece was created by a mold of a young adult male, and extend down to the lower wrist giving vivid detail of the joints. The scale is 1:1. The crevices and wear marks were all created by stress marks from creation, none were intentionally placed. This execution follows the concept that most harm comes not due to personal choices, but simply from circumstantial means. We see that the joints are colored with a copper stain, creating a dark focal point for the piece. The jagged edge shows imperfection, a weathered edge to follow the theme. Overall “Hands of the Oppressed” is not prized for its original creation before the bisque, but for raw marks brought out so vividly by the stains that were applied after words, each mark telling a story of its own.

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Body Piece: Sculpture
“Hands of the Oppressed”
4.5” x 6” x 4” each

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Body Piece: Mold
Partial Arm and Hand
4.5” x 20” x 4”

Pinching Ceramics Pieces

These pieces are examples of pinching done by both experimental and traditional methods. From the glossy blue of the Blue Sea Coral piece to the contrasted texture of the Black Table, all were originally created by hand and small crafting tools that were available thousands of years ago. In particular, the Seed Pot, a pit fired piece measuring only 27 cubic inches, shows methods that have survived a millennium. This piece is completely spherical except for a minuscule hole in the top, and rattles as it would if seeds were within it. The “Blue Sea Coral” is the largest piece, measuring ~300 cubic inches, and is covered in various glazes, each side with different densities; this gives the piece the water-like appearance. The glazing was done both by brush and air gun, giving the entirety a very glossy appearance. Lastly we have the raku’d “Black Table”. This piece measures 45 cubic inches and used clear crackle for the portion nearest the bottom. The varied texture of the carbon darkened top gives a wonderful focal point, in which all the shadows appear to emanating onto the glossy glaze below. Overall these pieces show 3 different techniques in which to finish a project, all turning out beautifully.

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Pinching: Experimental Glaze
“Blue Sea Coral”
6” x 5” x 10”

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Pinching: Experimental Raku
Black Top Table
3” x 3” x 3”

Hosted by Wucas.org

Lucas Warren 2013
Pinching: Traditional Pit fire
Stone Age Seed Pot
5” x 3” x 3”